The Gospel as Center

gospel-as-centerWhat is the center of your life? Is it family, your job, your sports team, money, possessions? There are so many things that vie for our allegiance. And more than that, not only our allegiance, but our ownership. I once heard someone say, “Whatever we own, owns us”. That is true in so many aspects.

A book I received quite a while back has been slowly helping me re-center on what is the core of my whole life. This book is titled, “The Gospel as Center”. It is a collaboration of essays by a great set of minds and thinkers in the evangelical (and overall reformed) world. This book builds a theological foundation on what is essentially the core of all aspects of theology, the Gospel. One thing I enjoyed most about this book was seeing the way the different writers tackled each subject. I love when great minds come together and tackle a project with a mission of proclaiming the Gospel.

This book may be a little technical and academic in some areas. Therefore, its readership may not reach a big audience, but it probably deserve to be read and read slowly by all of us that are constantly battling relativism in ministry and mainstream life.

Readership will most likely be those involved in full time ministry or para-ministry leadership.

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The Lost Art of Reading

8518218Obviously I like reading. No wait, love is a better word. Give me a library over a sports game any day of the week. Half Price Bookstores are fatal to my bank account. And my kids usually shout, “We are not going to a bookstore today!” whenever we go out somewhere together.

Reading takes up a lot of my spare time. It is vitally important to me. I will read most anything at anytime anywhere. We recently packed stuff up for a move and I had quite a few big boxes of books, like 10 or 12!

Unfortunately, reading has fallen on hard times. Internet, TV, game systems, etc. have taken away reading’s stronghold in most everyone’s life. That is why I love books like “The Lost Art of Reading by David Ulin.

Ulin shares with the reader why reading is essential. Imagination, cognition and relationship skills are all wrapped up in reading and reading well. One main assertion of this book is that we need to disengage from electronic media and return to the lost art of reading. In fact, Ulin describes reading as a revolutionary act against our culture and its demands.

This is a small book both physically and length wise. It comes in at 150 pages. Ulin is a book critic for the Los Angeles Times. Take some time to read this important work of why reading is so important. You’ll learn that reading is its own reward.

Other thoughts:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R291AEX0Y15PKN/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1570616701

http://www.amazon.com/review/R2RC63ELPB81IV/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1570616701

A Child Called “It”

60748Have you ever read a book and stepped back and thought about how incredibly blessed you are or were? I recently read a book that made me do just that. The name of this book is “A Child Called It” by Dave Pelzer.

The book chronicles the life of Dave as a young boy in a happy family that slowly descends into a time of intense physical, emotional and spiritual abuse. The spiral begins with his mother slowly becoming an alcoholic. With each drink, she sinks deeper and deeper into a dark hole that expresses itself as brutally beating, starving and torturing the author.

Dave tells many stories of the abuse he underwent, but underlying it all is an inspirational story of a young boy that still believes in the power of love and hope. In the end, after many, many years of abuse, Dave escapes in part due to concerned and involved teachers and school counselors.

Here are some additional resources and reviews on the book:

Positive Review here

Negative Review here

The 5 Love Languages of Children

What is Love? Now before you start the Roxbury head nod, this is not such an easy question. How is love shown and to what degree? Do we all respond to love in the same ways and to certain expressions of love?

Obviously, love is its own language. More often than not, how we respond, act and behave indicates either a plenitude or a lack of love. What co-authors and counselors Gary Chapman and Ross Campbell show us is, this may have to do with how love is spoken to us.

This book deals with children’s love languages and the ways these languages manifest themselves in kids lives. Reading this book will help you better understand why your child acts and responds the way she does. You will also find practical and useful application on how to figure out your child’s love language. The result is a better response and an  increased awareness on how to lead and guide your children through the use of their love language.

This is a great resource for parents, teachers and pastors (especially children’s). I would have liked to see more interaction and biblical support, but over all this is a solid and good book.

Happy reading!